Shutting Down Your Intel Galileo running Windows

UPDATED ON 09/10/2014 – Added remote shutdown info

On the “Setting up your Galileo” page, at the very bottom, there is a strong recommendation to shutdown your Intel Galileo running Windows.  The promise is that if you properly shutdown the Galileo, as opposed to just pulling the power cord, or hitting the “Reboot” button, you will experience shorter boot times.  I can confirm this personally after having rebooted my Galileo’s repeatedly, using all of the methods, over the past few days.  If you can connect to your Galileo via Telnet, and shut it down formally, it will boot much quicker next time. 

Here is a repeat for the instructions from the “Setting up your Galileo” page:

Shutting down the Galileo

Before you unplug the power from the Galileo, it is advisable to gracefully shut it down. To do this:

  1. Telnet to the Galileo
  2. Enter the following command to shutdown:
    shutdown /s /t 0

After the microSD activity LED stops blinking, you may unplug the Galileo.

NOTE:

If you do not shut the Galileo down, the next boot will take much longer. During this time, Windows will run a check disk on the SD card to verify the integrity of the file system. Please allow this to finish.

Shutting down the Galileo REMOTELY

This morning, I started to think about shutting it down remotely.  Not a big deal.  Windows admin do remote shutdowns all the time, and it is no different with the galileo.  You just need to authenticate against the galileo before you run the shutdown command against it.  I created a batch file called “bouncegalileo.cmd” that let’s me do that easily.  Here are the contents of the batch fi8le:

@ECHO OFF
REM
REM USAGE: bouncegalileo.cmd <galileoname>
REM Where <galileoname> is the host name of your galileo
REM
REM First, remove any existing connections to the galileo
net use \\%1 /del
REM Now, authenticate against the galileo as the Administrator
net use \\%1 /user:Administrator
REM Then use the shutdown command to restart the galileo immediately
REM The /r causes the galileo to RESTART.  Use /s to SHUTDOWN
shutdown /m \\%1 /r /t 0

Wrap that up in a batch file (I called mine “bouncegalileo.cmd”) and then the call to it would look something like this:

image

You can monitor your Galileo’s status in the “GalileoWatcher” .  It should take minute or so to come back on line.

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DevOps with Azure and Visual Studio Online

I’m presenting at Denver Dev Day today on “DevOps with Azure and Visual Studio Online”.  If you’d like a copy of my slides, you can grab there here: http://1drv.ms/1mVXDGI

Azure Tour Overview

SQL Server 2014 RTM VM Images available on Azure

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If you go into the Azure Management Portal today, you can now add SQL Server 2014 RTM VM Images using the Gallery!  Check it out!

Why can’t I link my MSDN Azure Subscription to my Visual Studio Online Account?

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Because you can’t.  Sorry, I know that may seem like a harsh way to start, but I figured it might help to have clarity from the start. 

The reason you need to link an Azure subscription to a Visual Studio Online (VSO) account is so that VSO can use your Azure account’s billing mechanism to bill for additional VSO users, build minutes, or virtual user minutes that you need beyond the free users and minutes. So you can only do that with a paid Azure Subscription that has an active billing configuration.

I speak for myself here, I’m not part of the group responsible for this, but my speculation as to why you can’t do it is as follows.  If you were allowed to link your MSDN Azure subscription though, there is a built in credit in that subscription.  You would effectively be able to use your free MSDN Azure benefit to provide paid VSO access to others.  That just doesn’t make sense, using your benefit to give access to others.  So for now at least, it just isn’t allowed. 

If you want to play with Visual Studio Online paid accounts or minutes, you could create a Free Windows Azure Trial subscription, and link it to a Visual Studio Online account.  You might consider creating a special Microsoft Account (a.k.a. Live ID) just for the test, and create the test VSO and Azure subscriptions using that test Microsoft Account. 

Note, if you do go to create a new Microsoft Account for the test, it helps to do that in an “InPrivate Browsing” (Ctrl+Shift+P in Internet Explorer) or an “Incognito Window” (Ctrl+Shift+N in Chrome) window so you don’t conflict with your regular Microsoft Account. 

New Azure “Basic” Virtual Machines

Yesterday (March 31, 2014), Microsoft announced some new Azure price drops, and some new VM and storage options.  You can read the entire announcement here, and you should because there is some storage goodness, like a “Zone Reduntant Storage” (ZRS) alternative to the current “Locally Redundant Storage” (LRS) and “Geo Redundant Storage” (GRS) redundancy options.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2014/03/30/microsoft-azure-innovation-quality-and-price.aspx

However, there was one topic I thought might be of direct interest to developers:

New “Basic” Tier Virtual Machines

Currently, Azure VMs come in two “tiers”. The “Standard” tier has VM sizes A0-A4 (Extra Small to Extra Large), and the “Memory Intensive Instances” tier has sizes A5-A7.  In yesterday’s announcement their will be a new “Basic” tier.  These will be similar machine configurations to the “Standard” A0-A4, but the new “Basic” VMs won’t include load balancing or auto-scaling options. 

These new “Basic” VMs might be of interest to developers who are using Azure VMs for Dev/Test workloads and don’t need the load balancing and autos-caling features. These basic VMs will give developers equivalent compute capabilities at a lower cost if load balancing and auto-scaling are needed.

The new “Basic” VMs should be available starting April 3rd, 2014 and the pricing will be updated and displayed on the Virtual Machines Pricing Details page.

Azure Dev Camp LA Info and Links

Thanks all that came to the Azure Dev Camp in LA today.  Here is a quick and dirty blog post to share the various links and contact info from today:

Look for the “Global Windows Azure Bootcamp” coming up on 03/29:
gwab-sandiego.eventday.com

"Fixed" Labs Download:    http://aka.ms/wadclabs
Doesn’t include Azure Active Directory, Service Bus or Windows 8 & Windows Phone 8 Expenses apps

Original Labs Download: http://aka.ms/h2wadc  
Download the "Scenario Content" zip file if you want to try Windows Azure Active Directory & Service Bus

If you need:
Visual Studio 2013:    http://aka.ms/vs13eval
SQL Server Exp. 2012:    http://aka.ms/sqlexp12
Windows Azure SDK:    http://aka.ms/wazsdks

Contact Info:

Bret Stateham
http://BretStateham.com
Bret.Stateham@microsoft.com

Daniel Egan
http://TheSociableGeek.com
Daniel.Egan@microsoft.com

Michele Leroux Bustamante
http://www.slideshare.net/MicheleBusta
http://MicheleBusta.com
michelebusta@gmail.com

Bret’s BizSpark Tutorial

BizSpark Tutorial:    http://aka.ms/bsbstut
Contact me if you need help getting signed up with BizSpark!

Xamarin.iOS v1.10 fixes issues Windows Phone and Windows Store app development in VS 2013

If you have Xamarin.iOS 1.8.365 installed along side your Visual Studio 2013 installation, you may have noticed problems with Windows Phone and Windows Store projects not displaying correctly in the designer.  They would build ok, but you can’t set the debug target device, and the designer is broken and shows an “Invalid Markup” message, and there are a ton of Errors about the XAML.  Errors like ‘The Name “PhoneApplicationPage” does not exist in the namespace…’, etc. Here’s a screenshot of what the errors look like:

Xamarin.iOS v1.8.365 Causes Windows Phone App Errors in Visual Studio 2013
Click picture to view larger version….

To fix the problem, update to Xamarin.iOS 1.10 (info) or later. I can’t find a direct download link to the beta versions, but you can get it by telling your existing install to update via the “Beta” rather than “Stable” channel.  To do that:

  1. Open Visual Studio 2013, and open the “Tools” | “Options” menu. 
  2. On the “Xamarin” | “Android Settings” page, turn on the “Notify me about” checkbox.
  3. In the update channel drop-down box (reads “Stable by default) choose “Beta” updates.
  4. Click the “Check Now” link to check for updates now. 

Xamarin.Android Beta Channel

Repeat the process above, but on the “Xamarin” | “iOS Settings” page:

Xamarin.iOS Beta Channel

Allow the updates to be installed. 

When the updates have completed, you can verify their versions in the Visual Studio “Help” | “About Microsoft Visual Studio” window.

Xamarin Versions in Visual Studio

Once updated, you should now be able to open an existing Windows Phone or Windows Store app in Visual Studio 2013 and no longer receive errors. 

How to Use a Windows Azure VM for Windows 8.1 Development

04/11/2014 – Update – There have been a few changes to the portal since I recorded the video below, but the basic process is the same.  I also have a step-by-step walkthrough that you can use. To get the walkthrough, download the AzureDevVMWalkthrough.zip file from http://1drv.ms/1kBzFFr

I go to a lot of hackathons, live events, user groups, etc. where people want to do Windows 8.1 development, but need a Windows 8.1 machine to do so.  While there are a ton of different ways that you can get Windows 8.1, one way is to use Virtual Machines.  Windows Azure let’s you create and host virtual machines in the cloud.  The rub is that you can’t create a Windows 8.1 VM.  You can however create a Windows Server 2012 R2 VM in Azure, and configure it to allow you to do Windows 8.1 development!  Cool! 

The following video walks you step by step through the process.  Overall, plan on taking about 2 hours to get your VM setup (installing Visual Studio 2013 alone takes about 30 minutes).  That means that if you are thinking of using this in a hackathon, you want to do this a day or two ahead of time.  However, when you are done you’ll have a great VM you can use to build apps for Windows 8.1.

The basic steps are:

  1. Sign into the Windows Azure Management Portal
  2. Create a new Virtual Machine using the Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter gallery image
  3. Connect to the new VM using RDP and login using the admin credentials you provided during its creation
  4. Create a new user account that also has administrative privileges (because the built-in admin account can’t deploy Windows Store apps on Server 2012).  Disconnect an reconnect as the new user.
  5. Turn OFF the IE Enhanced Security Configuration
  6. Turn ON the User Desktop Experience Feature (Requires a restart)
  7. Install Visual Studio 2013 Ultimate using the Web Installer either from the free trial or from MSDN (Requires a restart)
  8. Apply Visual Studio 2013 Updates
  9. Install the Windows Azure SDK
  10. Connect up to your TFS project on visualstudio.com, or use some other source control repo to share code

HACKTECH Prep Session

If you will be attending HACKTECH this weekend, there are some special challenges and prizes for developers who develop for Windows 8, Windows Phone, and Windows Azure.  We’ll have a couple of prep sessions

1) Monday, January 20th from 8pm to 9pm: http://aka.ms/htms1
2) Tuesday, January 21st from 3pm to 4pm: http://aka.ms/htms2

You can grab a copy of my slides here.

You can watch a video recording of the session here, or below:

Resources:

Prepare for the hackathon: Windows8AppFactor.com/Prepare

Some training resources:

Windows Developer Center (dev.windows.com)

Windows Phone Developer Center (dev.windowsphone.com)

Windows Azure (windowsazure.com)

DreamSpark (dreamspark.com)

BizSpark (bizspark.com)

Microsoft Developer Network (msdn.com)

Debugging Self Hosted WCF Services requires Admin Permissions

If you are trying to create a Self-Hosted WCF Service, the host process needs permissions to reserve the base URI used by the service.  If it doesn’t, you’ll get an “AddressAccessDeniedException”. 

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The fix?  Simple, run Visual Studio as an Administrator.  Hold down the “Shift” key and Right-Click on the Visual Studio icon.  Select “Run as administrator” (if your account is a local admin) or “Run as different user” and enter the credentials for an administrative account:

image

Or, from the Windows 8 Start Screen, right click on the icon, or Live Tile and select “Run as administrator”:

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