Just ordered my Edison!

I’ve been having a ton of fun with my Intel Galileo Blog Posts, but I have been anxiously awaiting the Intel Edison, a much smaller, but still “arduino compatible” development board.  On September 9, at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) Intel announced the Edison, and showed off a lot of cool things you can do with it.

I just jumped on SparkFun and ordered both the Edison with the Arduino Breakout Kit as well as the Edison with the Mini Breakout Kit and some of the SparkFun “Blocks”.  Now I just have to wait 6-8 weeks to get them (fingers drumming on table).

Intel® Edison and Arduino Breakout Kit

Shutting Down Your Intel Galileo running Windows

UPDATED ON 09/10/2014 – Added remote shutdown info

On the “Setting up your Galileo” page, at the very bottom, there is a strong recommendation to shutdown your Intel Galileo running Windows.  The promise is that if you properly shutdown the Galileo, as opposed to just pulling the power cord, or hitting the “Reboot” button, you will experience shorter boot times.  I can confirm this personally after having rebooted my Galileo’s repeatedly, using all of the methods, over the past few days.  If you can connect to your Galileo via Telnet, and shut it down formally, it will boot much quicker next time. 

Here is a repeat for the instructions from the “Setting up your Galileo” page:

Shutting down the Galileo

Before you unplug the power from the Galileo, it is advisable to gracefully shut it down. To do this:

  1. Telnet to the Galileo
  2. Enter the following command to shutdown:
    shutdown /s /t 0

After the microSD activity LED stops blinking, you may unplug the Galileo.

NOTE:

If you do not shut the Galileo down, the next boot will take much longer. During this time, Windows will run a check disk on the SD card to verify the integrity of the file system. Please allow this to finish.

Shutting down the Galileo REMOTELY

This morning, I started to think about shutting it down remotely.  Not a big deal.  Windows admin do remote shutdowns all the time, and it is no different with the galileo.  You just need to authenticate against the galileo before you run the shutdown command against it.  I created a batch file called “bouncegalileo.cmd” that let’s me do that easily.  Here are the contents of the batch fi8le:

@ECHO OFF
REM
REM USAGE: bouncegalileo.cmd <galileoname>
REM Where <galileoname> is the host name of your galileo
REM
REM First, remove any existing connections to the galileo
net use \\%1 /del
REM Now, authenticate against the galileo as the Administrator
net use \\%1 /user:Administrator
REM Then use the shutdown command to restart the galileo immediately
REM The /r causes the galileo to RESTART.  Use /s to SHUTDOWN
shutdown /m \\%1 /r /t 0

Wrap that up in a batch file (I called mine “bouncegalileo.cmd”) and then the call to it would look something like this:

image

You can monitor your Galileo’s status in the “GalileoWatcher” .  It should take minute or so to come back on line.

SNAGHTML491e103

Getting Started with Windows on the Intel Galileo (Gen 1)

This is the second video in my Intel Galileo Series.  In this video, I show you how to get the free version of Windows from the Windows Developer Program for IoT running on your Intel Galileo Gen 1 board.

Here are some handy links for this video:

You can get the source files for the entire series from:
http://aka.ms/IoTSource

Or download a .zip file with the latest version of the files from:
http://aka.ms/IoTZip

And finally, watch all the other videos here:
http://aka.ms/IoTVids